Monthly Archives: September 2012

davido acquires 140mill worth of property in lekki

David, the young talented and the e ma dami duro croner who is in his early 20’s his sure hitting the music goldmine big.Report reaching us claimed that following in the footsteps of his billionaire father who reportedly built a ‘mega church’ structure, for the seven day Adventist church in another dimension, has decided to show that life is not about the blings, fast cars or parties as he recently acquired a splendid property worth about N140 million. Although, one wonders, if that is the exact amount he paid to own the property but going by current market value, the house should cost nothing less!

The property which is located at a choice place on the island precisely Lekki Phase1, is close to where his father edifice was erected. This really complimented the earlier acquisition of a Brand New Audi Jeep worth 12M to his Fleet of Cars some Few Months back

Wel…This is really a proof that naija music industry is showering him with lots of returns.keep bangin bobo

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Terry Gsus New Look.

A new wave is sweeping across the Nigerian entertainment industry and is catching up one by one with the big fishes. Call it coincidence or re-branding, these guys are determined to leave you second guessing their next move.

Timaya led the pack when he appeared without his signature dreadlock that many fans had come to recognize him with. Then Basket Mouth in an unexpected move, also chopped of his own dreads and while we were yet to get over that, ‘I celebrate’ crooner, Waconzy even took his own further by not only cutting off his dreads but also dyeing his hair blonde.

This one should be the most surprising and who else would give us this type of shock effect than the Akpako master himself, Terry G. The singer was seen wearing a new look which makes him look very much like a gentle R&B singer – yes, I know, looks don’t make singers but his persona as a weird, ‘crazy’ and energetic performer was sort of attached to that old look.

One wonders if this delectable new look of Terry G was to showcasing his re-branding gimmicks.Hoe such “office look” keep him out of trouble as usual.

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fake deputy CP arrested in Ogun

The Nigerian Security operatives on the 24th of sept. Monday 2012 arrested an impostor deputy commissioner of police inside the premises of the Ogun State Governor’s Office, Oke-Mosan, Abeokuta.

The impostor commissioner, who was said to have been arrested in company with two other persons, was found in possession of some items, including objects suspected to be charms.

The fake police officer identified as Mr. T. A Banjo was apprehended while he and his two other accomplices were trying to find their way to the office of the Secretary to the State Government, Mr.Taiwo Adeoluwa located within the same premises.

vigilant security operatives had promptly arrested them haven noticed their Suspicious movement within the Governor’s Office Complex, .

When questioned by security operatives, Banjo one of culprit reportedly claimed that three of them were on a visit to the governor’s office to see the Secretary to the State Government, Adeoluwa.

Items including a police officer’s Identity Card with the rank of Deputy Commissioner, a National Identity Card , handsets and objects suspected to be charms were found on the three suspects.

Their arrest created a very uneasiness among workers in the SSG office who became apprehensive following the news that a fake policeman who claimed to be on a visit to their boss had been arrested and found to be in possession of charms,when searched.

The state Police Public Relations Officer, Muyiwa Adejobi said the suspects were longed remanded in the custody of the police force at the Command Headquarters, Eleweran.

An assistant superintendent of police, Adejobi said, The incident was a clear case of impersonation. He has the I D card of the rank of deputy Commissioner.it is impersonation,we are taking over the case.He must have used it to perpetrate some evils. We cannot condone this evil

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NigerIAN PoLiCe InHuMaNe BeHaViOur….

A closer scrutiny reveals Miss Chidinma is a troubled teen. She has been sexually abused serially by those least expected. Her life may never remain the same again.

The April sun was going to bed. Somewhere around Isheri, a Lagos suburb, a 15-year-old girl too was hurrying homeward. She wanted to arrive home before dusk. Suddenly, she struck her foot against a stone half buried in the earth.

The teenager hissed and made to continue with her journey. But one of her footwear did not obey her. A strap had snapped in one of the flip-flops that covered her dusty feet. Chidinma Olosota (not real names) hissed and moved on. After taking some steps, she decided to wait for a mobile cobbler to rectify the situation.

She looked around and sat at the front of a house. It was a decision that would affect her life. Not long after, a young man approached her, offering to help. The unsuspecting girl took the extended hand of help. A few hours later the young man raped her. Not only that, she was prevented from leaving the house.

Two days after, Chidinma struggled home to her already exasperated parents who were beside themselves with worries over the disappearance of their daughter. After showing her face at home, she was bundled straight to the church where the pastor lectured her on the gains of being an obedient child. It was the return of Chidinma’s father that exhumed any dirt the teenage girl thought had been buried.

The father insisted that he be taken to the house she spent two days. Reluctantly, the girl led her father to the house she spent the last two days. As soon as the father sighted the young who allegedly housed his daughter for two days, he was overcome by emotion and a shouting match ensued. Invectives and insults were hurled from both sides. Irked by the insolence demonstrated by the young man, Chainman’s father made for the Isheri Police Station to report the matter.

At the police station, the matter was assigned to an elderly police officer who is also said to be the Station Officer. The officer Mr Ajayi, according to a petition signed by 25 rights groups, blamed the girl for the rape “because she ran away from home.”

Also, she “was severely beaten by Inspector Ajayi with her father’s approval on the ground that she caused what happened to her”.

Meanwhile, that was just the beginning of other harrowing experience which the girl would go through in the hands of this particular law enforcement agent and his colleagues. “Inspector Ajayi then asked that Chidinma (not real name) remain at the police station for a couple of hours in order for her to ‘calm down’.

“Confident that Inspector Ajayi held a position of trust, Mr Olosota (not real name) complied with the instruction and left for work hoping that his daughter would soon be allowed to return home. Whilst at the police station, a number of police officers on duty sexually assaulted her, some fondled her breasts and others verbally abused her.

All of these took place in the presence of Inspector Ajayi and another female officer who goes by the name of Happiness,” alleged the petition which copies were sent to the the Inspector General of Police, Lagos State governor, Lagos State deputy governor, Office of the Public Defender (OPD), Divisional Police Officer, Isheri Police Station, Lagos, Lagos State Ministry of Women Affairs and Poverty Alleviation (WARA) and the Attorney General of Lagos State.

It continued: “Chindinma (not real names) was held at the Police Station all day till late in the evening without being offered any food. When she pleaded with Inspector Ajayi to release her to return home, he paraded her around the holding cells threatening detention with the male inmates. Ensuring that she was frightened enough, Inspector Ajayi took her back to his office.

In his office, he told her to write her statement and as she was writing, he was robbing her back telling her that he wants her to undress, when she refused, he threatened her. In her words: ‘Inspector Ajayi locked his office and told me that he wants to have sex with me and if I don’t agree, he will detain me till tomorrow and carry me and the boy to court so that I will go to prison’.

Apparently scared, she allowed him have his way. Right in the police station and right on the police desk, Inspector Ajayi raped Chidinma (not real name). At 9pm, Miss Chidinma (not real name) was released to go home” Chidinma confirmed the incident to Saturday Mirror adding that when he gave her a sachet of table water after and then allowed her to go home. She added that when she got home, she just went to bed without informing anybody of the incident.

The petition, however, alleged further that: “Inspector Ajayi did not take down Chidinma’s statement or the statement of the perpetrator and did not advise her to visit a general hospital for the necessary medical examination immediately after rape. He didn’t even open a case file for her. He only invited her and her father to the station the next day to go for a pregnancy test at Calvary Hospital, Omole Phase 2”.

But the teenage girl’s ordeal did not end there. On May 16 she was also raped. This time, the perpetrator is an acclaimed brother of a shop owner at Reality Plaza, Isheri. Her account: “A boy called IK now took us to the house. As we were going my friend excused herself saying she was to run an errand for her mum. Ike and I continued. When we got to the house, IK asked me to come inside but I refused. He now begged me to come and that he did not want to bring his sister’s phones outside. On getting inside, he asked to sit and offered me a newspaper.

He told me he was going inside to bring the phone. When he came back, he knelt beside me told me that there was no phone but that there was something he needed from. I asked him what. He then went inside again and brought a knife and asked me to pull off. He said he is a cultist and that he had done it before, that he would kill me and throw my body away in the night. When I refused he pressed the knife on my tummy and neck. When I saw blood, I started pulling off. I had on a gown and a pair of shorts. As I was doing that the N5, 000 which I kept in my knickers fell out and he picked it He asked me to lie down and I refused so he finally pushed me down and raped me.”

At the last incident, the girl could no longer hold it in. She returned to the shop with the aid of some good Samaritans and raised some dust. When her father got wind of the incident, he asked the daughter again to go to the police station, but she refused. On further probing, she finally owned up on why she did not want to return to the police station: she had lost confidence in the police.

That was when she opened up and told her father about her harassment by the officers and eventual rape by Ajayi. Saturday Mirror was at the said police station but everyone contacted declined to speak. Our correspondent was directed to the office of the Police Public Relations Officer. Frequent visits and calls to the officer, however, yielded no results. Twice her phone was picked by her orderly who promised to relay the message to her.

A message to the effect was also sent to her via her facebook account. Saturday Mirror was also at the office of the Officer in Charge (OC) Human Rights of the Lagos State Command Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) Amhedu, who is a lawyer.

Amhedu, who declined to speak with the press because he was not in a position to do so, said his office was aware of the matter. He also directed our reporter to the PPRO. However, a source in the Human Rights unit disclosed to Saturday Mirror that the matter was actually brought to the attention of the unit and that it was taken up and investigated.

The source added that the Commissioner of Police had been advised on the matter. Probed further, the source who disclosed that the unit has in its fold many lawyers of long bar experience added that during investigation, the victim, her father and the suspects including the police officer alleged were invited for interrogation.

“It was then that we discovered that the girl was wayward and that the father was trying to use her to extort money from Ajayi and the Nigerian Police. “It is true that Ajayi flogged her but he never raped her as claimed”, it added.

Asked how they came about their conclusion, the source continued: “In front of everybody we asked the policeman to strip and he did but he was not wearing the type of underwear the girl said he had on. We also sent a police officer to his office, it was not as the girl described. There was no television set and there was no couch.

The girl was just lying “We have reprimanded Ajayi. The police have no right to administer corporal punishment which he did by flogging the girl. We have recommended that he be sent on a six months course on human rights. We have also charged the first suspect to court. Though he claimed, he did not rape her; the girl was a minor then, hence could not give consent.

That is defilement. He has been charged to court and remanded in prison custody” The source also dismissed the claim against the third suspect, IK, saying he was culpable and that the girl’s father also wanted to exploit the young man and his sister.

The source, however, reprimanded the girl’s father accusing him of wanting to use his daughter to exploit the said police officer who was actually his friend before the incident.

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New Discovery: Banana Can Prevent HIV Infection

Your favorite oblong fruit might be even healthier than you realized. According to The Gazette (Montreal) newspaper, a new study has found that chemicals commonly found in bananas are as potent in preventing HIV as two synthetic anti-HIV drugs.

Researchers say the findings could lead to a cheap new component for applied microbicides that prevent intimate transmission of HIV.

The miracle substance in bananas is called BanLec, a type of lectin, which are the sugar-binding proteins found in a variety of plants. Scientists have long been interested in lectins because of their ability to halt the chain reaction that leads to certain viral infections. In the case of BanLec, it works by binding naturally to the sugar-rich envelope that encases the HIV virus, thus blocking its entry into the body.

“The problem with some HIV drugs is that the virus can mutate and become resistant, but that’s much harder to do in the presence of lectins,” said lead author Michael D. Swanson. “Lectins can bind to the sugars found on different spots of the HIV-1 envelope, and presumably it will take multiple mutations for the virus to get around them.”

Swanson and his colleagues noted that even modest success in developing BanLec into a womanly or BehindBased microbicide could save millions of lives. In fact, 20 percent coverage with a microbicide that is only 60 percent effective against HIV may prevent up to 2.5 million HIV infections in three years.

Furthermore, a BanLec ointment would be much cheaper to produce and distribute than most current anti-retroviral medications that require the production of synthetic components.

One thing’s for sure: new ways of stopping the transmission of HIV are desperately needed. Condoms are effective, but they are often used incorrectly or inconsistently, and in many cultures and developing countries women are not always in control of their intimate encounters.

The introduction of a cheap, long-lasting, self-applied ointment derived naturally from bananas could change all of that.

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Hiphopostery!!

HIP-HOP HISTORY

Jamaican born DJ Clive “Kool Herc” Campbell is credited as being highly influential in the pioneering stage of hip hop music, in the Bronx, after moving to New York at the age of thirteen. Herc created the blueprint for hip hop music and culture by building upon the Jamaican tradition of toasting – or boasting impromptu poetry and sayings over music – which he witnessed as a youth in Jamaica.
Herc and other DJs would tap into the power lines to connect their equipment and perform at venues such as public basketball courts and at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, Bronx, New York, a historic building “where hip hop was born”. Their equipment was composed of numerous speakers, turntables, and one or more microphones. By using this technique djs could create a variety of music. According to Rap Attack by David Toop “At its worst the technique could turn the night into one endless and inevitably boring song” (12). In late 1979, Debbie Harry of Blondie took Nile Rodgers of Chic to such an event, as the main backing track used was the break from Chic’s.
Herc, along with Cale Nosack was also the developer of break-beat deejaying, where the breaks of funk songs—the part most suited to dance, usually percussion-based—were isolated and repeated for the purpose of all-night dance parties. This breakbeat DeeJaying, using hard funk, rock, and records with Latin percussion, formed the basis of hip hop music. Campbell’s announcements and exhortations to dancers would lead to the syncopated, rhymed spoken accompaniment now known as rapping. He dubbed his dancers break-boys and break-girls, or simply b-boys and b-girls. According to Herc, “breaking” was also street slang for “getting excited” and “acting energetically”. Herc’s terms b-boy, b-girl and breaking became part of the lexicon of hip hop culture, before that culture itself had developed a name.
Later DJs such as Grand Wizard Theodore, Grandmaster Flash and Jazzy Jay refined and developed the use of breakbeats, including cutting and scratching. The approach used by Herc was soon widely copied, and by the late 1970s DJs were releasing 12″ records where they would rap to the beat. Popular tunes included Kurtis Blow’s “The Breaks”, and The Sugar Hill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight”.
Emceeing is the rhythmic spoken delivery of rhymes and wordplay, delivered over a beat or without accompaniment. Rapping is derived from the griots (folk poets) of West Africa, and Jamaican-style toasting. Rap developed both inside and outside of hip hop culture, and began with the street parties thrown in the Bronx neighborhood of New York in the 1970s by Kool Herc and others. It originated as MCs would talk over the music to promote their DJ, promote other dance parties, take light-hearted jabs at other lyricists, or talk about problems in their areas and issues facing the community as a whole. Melle Mel, a rapper/lyricist with The Furious Five, is often credited with being the first rap lyricist to call himself an “MC”.
In the late 1970s an underground urban movement known as “hip-hop” began to develop in the South Bronx area of New York City. Encompassing graffiti art, break dancing, rap music, and fashion, hip-hop became the dominant cultural movement of the African American communities in the 1980s. Tagging, rapping, and break dancing were all artistic variations on the male competition and one-upmanship of street gangs. Sensing that gang members’ often violent urges could be turned into creative ones, Afrika Bambaataa founded the Zulu Nation, a loose confederation of street-dance crews, graffiti artists, and rap musicians. By the late 1970s, the culture had gained media attention, with Billboard magazine printing an article titled “B Beats Bombarding Bronx”, commenting on the local phenomenon and mentioning influential figures such as Kool Herc.
Hip hop as a culture was further defined in 1982, when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force released the seminal electro-funk track “Planet Rock”. Instead of simply rapping over disco beats, Bambaataa created an electronic sound, taking advantage of the rapidly improving drum machine, synthesizer technology as well as sampling from Kraftwerk.
The appearance of music videos changed entertainment: they often glorified urban neighborhoods. The music video for “Planet Rock” showcased the subculture of hip hop musicians, graffiti artists, and b-boys/b-girls. Many hip hop-related films were released between 1982 and 1985, among them Wild Style, Beat Street, Krush Groove, Breakin, and the documentary Style Wars. These films expanded the appeal of hip hop beyond the boundaries of New York. By 1985, youth worldwide were embracing the hip hop culture. The hip hop artwork and “slang” of US urban communities quickly found its way to Europe and Asia, as the culture’s global appeal took root.
The 1980s also saw many artists make social statements through hip hop. In 1982, Melle Mel and Duke Bootee recorded “The Message” (officially credited to Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five), a song that foreshadowed the socially conscious statements of Run-DMC’s “It’s like That” and Public Enemy’s “Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos”.
During the 1980s, hip hop also embraced the creation of rhythm by using the human body, via the vocal percussion technique of beatboxing. Pioneers such as Doug E. Fresh, Biz Markie and Buffy from the Fat Boys made beats, rhythm, and musical sounds using their mouth, lips, tongue, voice, and other body parts. “Human Beatbox” artists would also sing or imitate turntablism scratching or other instrument sounds.

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A blissful birthday expression..

Innocent Ujah Idibia better known as 2Face today, Tuesday, September 18 clocks 37. The ‘African pride’ was born in Jos, Plateau State in 1975. Little did the Idoma, Benue State artiste know he would be this great when he formed the defunct R&B/hip hop group ‘Plantashun Boyz’ with Blackface and Face, who later joined them when they (2Face and Blackface) met Face in Lagos.

2Face attended Mount Saint Gabriel’s Secondary School, Makurdi, Benue State. He then proceeded to the Institute of Management & Technology, Enugu (IMT), where he met Blackface, for a pre-National Diploma course in Business Administration and Management. Unfortunately, 2Face didn’t graduate, but that didn’t stop him from achieving success in his music career.

While at IMT, 2Face did some jingles for GB Fan Club aired on Enugu State Broadcasting Services (ESBS). The name ‘2Face’ was coined in 1996. The name came about because he aimed at differentiating his personal life with his business life.

He has released some smash hit songs in which ‘African Queen’ has been the biggest. He is the CEO of Hypertek Entertainment which has Dammy Krane as its artiste. 2Face is known for helping young talents grow in the industry. He has featured in many songs of up and coming artistes.

He is happily married to Nollywood actress, Annie Macaulay who has a daughter for him. He has five other child from other relationships.

best of luck bros we got your back

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DbaNj’s and DoN jAzzY feud…what went wrong

Who leaves a zone where they’re comfortable and celebrated; where they’re established and successful, for a place where no one seems to give the slightest care? D’banj, that’s who.

The 31 year-old entertainer has spent nearly two years building structures he hopes will help take his music to new markets in Europe, and especially America. This move, he believes, cost him his friendship and business relationship with his long time partner Don Jazzy.

‘I’m a risk taker’, he says. ‘Life is all about risks. But you must never endanger yourself. I don’t endanger myself, which is why, even though I’m here, I’m still in Nigeria all the time, performing’.

With incredible energy, and the kind of passion that endeared everyone to him when he first moved back to Nigeria in 2005, D’banj says his deal with Kanye West is a case of ‘preparation meets opportunity’.

‘I pulled up with my entourage at the Emirates first class lounge in Dubai. We were returning from Scott Tommey’s birthday. I came down with Bankuli, my P.A. Chuchu, and my business manager Chidi. My entourage was large and I was looking fly. One of the hostesses ran to me with a Kanye West placard. I said I’m not Kanye o – then I told my guys ‘Kanye is around so no dulling.’ Chuchu and Bankuli spotted Kanye walking in to check in. They went to him and he said we could come over’.

‘As they came, I had my iPad with me, and my headphones. First thing Kanye said was ‘I like your T-shirt’. I wore a Zara T-shirt and a D&G ring. He liked my appearance and said he’d give me 5 minutes. I told him ‘I played with you in Nigeria during NB PLC Star Megajam. I’ve done a song with Snoop and we’re going to shoot the video now. I’d like to play you my songs.’ I played Oliver, Scapegoat, and Fall in love. He was dancing. He removed the headphones and said ‘I don’t mean to sound rude, but if anyone has to bring you out in the states, it has to be me, not Snoop. He asked when I was going to be in the US, and I told him I was going there that day. Then he asked who my producer was, and I said Don Jazzy. He said ‘come with him.’

Three months later, D’banj, Don Jazzy and their crew were in New York, where, according to D’banj, it took almost forever before they could establish contact with Kanye. ‘It was only an email address he gave us at the airport. So when we got to NY, we sent several emails but got no response. Not a single one.’

‘Then we met someone that knew someone that knew another someone and we got another email address. We sent several messages again, no response. Then Bankuli sent a final one saying, ‘we have been in New York for some time and sent several emails. We have waited long enough and are now on our way to do the Snoop Dogg video.’

And then the reply came. ‘Sorry to have overlooked your earlier emails. Mr. Kanye would like to meet with you tomorrow.’

‘We didn’t believe it. Don Jazzy, who had been reluctant all along, still did not believe it. Even when we got there (Wyclef’s studio) the next day, he stood outside. When Kanye came I went to call him ‘Oya come now, come play am the music now’. It was difficult to believe it was real and it was happening. Then when Kanye came in, with the GOOD music acts, I was like, ‘wow’.

From there everything happened fast. Next they were meeting Jay Z, making a presentation to LA Reid (At Electric studios), and discussing contracts. But while the label offered him a traditional recording contract, D’banj opted for a joint venture agreement structured to guarantee three things: retaining full control of his materials in Africa, signing Don Jazzy on board (on behalf of Mohits USA), and, he says, bringing the Universal/Def Jam imprint to Africa.

‘I’ve always thought of how I can be a useful vessel to the industry. A friend and colleague always says to me: ‘D’banj, you’re the Jesus Christ of the industry.’ So having ran Mohits for nine years, I already had plans of how we could blow Mohits up. I had plans of expanding, and most especially, bringing hope to that 11 year-old kid somewhere in Africa who may never have had the opportunity to get signed to major labels’.

‘So it was not really just about me. There’s a big market in Africa. I said to them, ‘I’ve sold millions of records in Africa, we’ve done millions of hits with CRBT, and I’ve run the most successful label on the continent. You take care of the US, but let me take you to Africa.‘ And I’m happy to tell you that we’re doing that. D’banj’s album will be the first under Universal/Def Jam Africa, and we’re already putting all the structures in place’.

‘I’m a businessman.’ I learnt from my mom, who’s a very successful businesswoman. So having run and funded Mohits for nine years, I knew we had to move to the next level. And everything we wanted was happening. Finally we could take African music to the world.’

Just like the lyrics of the song, D’banj was an Oliver Twist. Here’s a guy who had conquered a continent; was sitting on the top three list, and making more money than anyone else in his category. D’banj was a big player in Nigeria, where there are over 150 million people; a big player in Africa, with over 850 million people. But he wanted to play big globally, with 7 billion people to grab from.

And that’s where the problem started. ‘Don Jazzy was no longer comfortable. You know, we were like fishes out of water, in this new system, starting all over again, like when we returned home in 2004. I got him a place in the US, set up a studio there, just so he’d be comfortable and be able to work without going to hang around the studios. In one year Jazzy did not make a song. I said, maybe you want to go back to Lagos, you’ll get inspiration there?’ I was all about the work, I wanted us to make this happen, so we can bridge that gap and create a path for Africa. But Jazzy wanted us to go back home. And I understand. He’s my friend, my brother’.

‘But I never expected him to do what he did.’ He said to me in July last year ‘Let’s scatter Mohits. He told me there are two captains – two captains cannot be in a ship. I was like ‘that’s not possible, this is a marriage’. He said ‘then this marriage is no longer working’. I said then let’s go for counseling; I asked, so what happens to our children?’

Don Jazzy wanted Mohits, D’banj says. And that happened on April 16, 2012 – after months of a bitter feud, characterized by accusations and counter accusations, widespread speculation, leaked emails and failed reconciliation attempts.

‘You can see he has signed already’, he said, showing the agreement with Don Jazzy’s signature. ‘I have full rights to my catalogue and full ownership of my Koko Holdings, while he has full ownership of Mo’Hits, including the artistes and liabilities.’

Already judged guilty in the court of public opinion, and publicly disowned by his own boys Wande Coal and Dr SID, D’banj says he’s sad, but not bitter. Does he feel kind of lonely, alone in the cold? ‘Asking me if I’m lonely because Wande or Jazzy has left me is like asking my first sister if she’s lonely now – she has two kids now, lives in Canada. Don Jazzy is still my brother – we just had to move on. We’ll still work together in future, same with my boys. In fact, just this week, he sent me the remix to Oliver Twist that we’re releasing in the UK on May 14. All the interviews I’ve had here, I kept hyping him. It’s already in my system – you know me, I’m a one-way soldier. Jazzy is a very quiet person. Loyalty is key. My loyalty still lies in the friendship I had with him. He was cheated by JJC, and I was present. I swore never to cheat him. But I’d like to think our visions became different.

‘It was clear when we met that Jazzy wanted to be the biggest producer, I wanted to be the biggest African entertainer, not the biggest singer. I had my mind on money. In order to say I’m the biggest, I had to be the richest. So for a very long time, he was on the back end. He respected my act, I respected his music judgment. Every meeting that brought us money I went for. I’d say I need to confirm from Don Jazzy because that was the agreement, even though I knew it was my decision. First Glo deal was $500,000. That Landcruiser jeep was because of my demands. It was because of the skill and exposure that I used to bargain. I’m a businessman’

‘People say I’m less talented, I was known as a jester in the JJC squad. I’d make everyone happy and play the mouth organ, but I knew what I wanted. I decided to give Don Jazzy power in 2007 when we realized that after four years, they did not recognize us as a record label. We had signed artistes and done all this work. So we restructured, and restrategized. So I told him to chill, so he can be more respected and be the don. I’m older than him by one year, yet I respected him like a don. I remember when he came out at Ali Baba show, I knelt down for him, so people would say he’s the baba. All the talking in my ears and all, it was an arrangement. All the Soundcity advert and all, he did not tell me anything. It was all an arrangement.’

With his UK publicist Vanessa Amadi taking notes nearby, his manager Bankulli interjecting every now and then, and several legal documents surrounding us, D’banj spoke passionately of his former partner in the same way a man might go on about a cherished and respected, but estranged, lover. He’s on his sixth cigarette, and thinks the room is stuffy, even though no one complains. So he opens the sliding glass for ventilation. ‘Jazzy did his part’, he says, sitting down again and looking me in the face. ‘He made the music for nine years. But nothing stops him from making for twenty more years. We could have changed the formula. Why didn’t he want to change the formula? It was time to expand the business, Mohits was Motown reloaded. We always knew we would expand, he always said I had more swagger than anyone else he knows, And I know he’s one of the best producers in the world; we wanted to make Mohits the biggest in Africa. Other labels were springing up. So if we could conquer America, London when no one had done it before. Most of our people stop in Germany, or Paris. But this is America, this is the big league; it makes us the strongest, the biggest. We had already made the money. And who best to introduce me to the rest of the world? Kanye did not want to change anything about my music, my style of dressing, or my brand. It is God’s favour. But Jazzy was and is very scared. Something had worked for eight years, so he wanted to maintain the status quo. People are afraid to try new things.’

‘But’, he tells me, still maintaining eye contact while lighting another cigarette, ‘I’m not afraid. I’m a vessel that God is trying to use to help the industry. I’m a bridge. Once in a few years, one artiste comes from the UK to run the world, none has come from Africa. Fela was the closest. It’s been my own dream; I made my name from Nigeria, unlike Seal, Wale, and Tinie Tempah. And I want to bring Universal, Def Jam and all to Nigeria. So if I can build that bridge, then we’re good, because it will give hope to the boys in Asaba, in Oshogbo that this thing is possible.’

The day after our Canary Wharf interview, we meet up at Highbury Islington, where he’s shooting a documentary and the promo for the Oliver Twist competition for the UK. D’banj’s new crew: Semtex (a white A&R rep from the label), Bankuli and Vanessa, are on the ground, working with the production team. ‘This is why we’re here o. This is the work’, he says as he invites me into the dressing room.

‘And when people say why am I not talking, this is why. I’m focused on making this happen. It’s more important for me to make sure I don’t disappoint all those who have invested in me; all those who believe in me and are supporting the movement, than to be fighting over who’s right or wrong. Even now that I’m talking to you, I don’t even know if I should be doing this interview.’

It’s very unexpected that D’banj – the super aggresive D’banj – is speaking in this manner. He has fought many battles, cut off many former friend-associates, ignored the Nigerian media, and reportedly humiliated several Mo’hits members, including Ikechukwu and Dr SID. Temperamental, often impatient, and vocal, those who know him will tell you the D’banj they know, is not the one that’s speaking.

So I ask:
The perception is that you’ve become arrogant, unreachable, proud. You’re not the D’banj we used to know; not the D’banj I used to know – and most people in the media will say this is true.

Obviously people will say stuff – but this is me. I can’t keep up with everyone, no matter how much I try. But I understand where I’m coming from. I cant forget my roots – all the interviews I had yesterday, I was ‘bigging up’ DJ Abass, he gave me my first show in London. You saw me giving Jazzy props in my interview earlier. That’s me. If I was arrogant I wouldn’t have been the one even chasing Jazzy around since he told me last July that he wanted to scatter Mohits. Last time I saw him was on February 19 at Irving Plaza. He didn’t support the show, and he only came on stage when SID and Wande were performing. I wanted peace.

And even my mom, who had supported us from beginning, who gave us the house we stayed in (in Michael Otedola estate, Lagos), the Previa bus we used and paid forTongolo video, spoke to his parents last December; ‘this is what your son said o’. I remember my mom saying to me, ‘if you guys have been together all these years, and no wahala, then if you need to part, I hope there’ll be no wahala.’ She was very particular about that. I had enough proof to have come out and speak; this thing has been on for a long time, and we’re in April now. But I don’t want to cause any wahala. I don’t want to spoil anything. I don’t want trouble. Right now, I just want to be able to move on and do my business.’

That’s surprising, because when the leaked emails emerged, revealing private email conversations between the estranged partners, all fingers pointed at D’banj. Don Jazzy, a likeable celeb and social media addict, didn’t have anything to prove. D’banj was the one who looked bad, and, understandably, would want to make a move that could earn him public sympathy.

‘The signing (away of my shares in Mohits) was already being discussed before April 16. If I kept quiet from January till now, what would it benefit me to leak anything? Remember all the stuff about my password and all? We know where that was from, I really wouldn’t want to think it was from him, my brother, but it could be from anywhere, but I don’t want to call anyone’s name.’

But were the emails forged?
Everything in those emails were facts. And I don’t even think the mails favoured me in any way. It’s not the exact mails that were sent and signed, but there were elements of truth in the mails that were published.’

Why did you tell Ebony you own Mohits?
My mom advised me not to speak. And the interviewer took it out of context. I co-owned Mohits. We registered the business in 2004, and we owned it 50:50. So I spoke about that, but the interviewer took it wrong and the fans put pressure on them and they corrected it.

How about Sahara Reporters?
I never wanted to have any interview. It was on the eve of my US show. I was told I should do the interview, because they’re very troublesome. I had to do the interview for the sake of my show the next day. I was guaranteed that there’d be no politics questions. I had not been in the country. And I had been under pressure. Sadly, when that happened and I was being attacked in the media, none of my guys came out to support me.

Looking at all this, what are your regrets?
The truth is that if nothing went wrong, you’d have still heard all this good news and Mohits would take the glory, I didn’t come out in eight years to say anything. Everyone made their contributions. There were no issues, as long as it worked. My mistake was thinking that we were one. People don’t question their brothers and sisters.

How do you feel about Wande Coal and Dr. SID taking sides with Jazzy?
I won’t be too quick to judge Wande Coal. I hear it was Jazzy that tweeted those Wande tweets. I don’t know how true that is, but I know he had our social media accounts. As at a month ago, I couldn’t access any of my accounts. My password was changed on Twitter and Facebook. Then Universal intervened. I’m about to be verified on Twitter now. I’m not really a social media person, so it was Don Jazzy and some of our other guys that were running it. Wande himself knows the truth. He cannot talk to me like that. The whole Mohits knew who ran the label businesswise.

They knew who to come to when they needed to get money out, after we recorded the album. Who knows the factory where Dansa was made? But you will know the marketing manager. The car he’s driving, I bought him a brand new Prado from Phyllis and Moss after he crashed the car he won from Hiphop World awards. I bought six Range Rovers last year. I bought D’Prince an LR 3 last year, he crashed it, then I bought him a Range, and it’s true that I bought two Bentleys. Because of Jazzy. But after July last year, after the issue with Jazzy, I bought myself the Aston Martin.

You bought that? I thought that was a gift?
I bought it.

How were you able to fund all that?
In the last nine years, there are a few people and corporate bodies that God has helped me build relationships with, either individuals or banks, or even corporates that are involved in the growth of the industry. I’ve enjoyed their support, and even now that we’re going global, we’re pooling the funds together from all these places.

Could you possibly be Nigeria’s richest pop star? A billionaire?
Vanity upon vanity. Money is material. In terms of what we’re doing, you’ll call me a Trillionaire, because this vision is too big for only me. With the help of the industry, the government, people like you Ayeni, we will not only be billionaires, but trillionaires, and not just me, but every little kid that has same talent like Beyonce, or Nicki Minaj. And with the standard of the UMG worldwide, we can pass people out from our own Universal Music Group Africa, Universal Def Jam Africa, and everyone should jump on this ship with us. It’s not the Titanic.

There’s been a lot of confusion – what label exactly are you signed on?
My album comes out under my label/GOOD Music/Island Def Jam. I’m funding the D’banj album, in America, through GOOD Music/Island Def Jam. GOOD Music is Kanye West who is co-executive producing with me. The deal comprises of Island Def Jam, in US. But in UK, it is under Mercury. My first single will be released in Europe on May 14. My work will be released in Africa through Universal/Def Jam.

We don’t have these structures in Africa, and they’ve seen how much money they’ve lost. They’ve seen what I’ve done with Mohits. I made my pitch to them; I’ve made them realize how much they were losing in the African region. Over 150m Nigerians, over 800m Africans. 2% of that is 8.5m. They were not making anything except from S.A, which has been the US of Africa. So we will be launching this label in Ghana, in partnership with Vodafone, launching in Nigeria in partnership with MTN. Def Jam Africa will be up soon; Kenya, SA, and North Africa will follow.

Why are you risking all this? What if you burn your fingers and lose everything you’ve worked for?
Lose out? Well, I am happy I even have something to risk. To whom much is given, much is expected. Look at Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Jay Z, Kanye West, these people take it to the max, take it to where they believe that they can push it to. In the first instance, coming back to Nigeria with Jazzy was because I was a risk taker. And I wouldn’t say I’m throwing everything away. I would say I’m putting everything back in, in order to rip into the future. I get a broadcast from Tonye Cole everyday. He says when you tell people this your vision, know that it’s not for you alone – it’s for everyone. It’s like what Fela did. If what I’m doing doesn’t work, but sows that seed that will germinate in three, five years, it means my name will be written in gold.

Some people have tried this before you, unsuccessfully. Do you have doubts and fears sometimes?
My last album was in July 2008 – no album in four years and I know what I still command in those four years. The momentum for me to be able to do this is because I see how much it took me, I saw the benefit, it’s God, and the favour of the relationships we’ve built. Plus, I don’t take no for an answer, I don’t take negativity. It will work in Jesus’ name. If not, I wouldn’t have landed in the UK and hear Oliver Twist on the radio. Nor would I be in the mainstream media with them saying I’m pioneering afrobeats. I said to them ‘Oh hell no, that’s Fela’s music. Fela is the legend.’ So I pray to God – I beg my fans, it‘ll be good to do half a million downloads. It’s possible, it’s a different market. Platinum in UK is 300,000. I believe with the support of my people in Redding, Coventry, Dusting, Hackney, Thamesmead, Abbeywood, we can do it.’

And so, as I say my goodbyes and flag down the cab that’ll take me to Heathrow Airport, I can’t help thinking out loud: should one man sacrifice the wishes of the collective on the altar of ambition and material wealth? But then, what should be expected of the man whose dreams and ambition grow beyond those of other – possibly myopic- members of the collective: should an individual sacrifice his personal desires; derail his destiny, so to speak, in the interest of the collective?

In all of this, faithfulness and loyalty have been brutally murdered. And the jury is still out on who pulled the trigger.

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A DeArThLy OrDeAl!!!

The role of the social media in building relationships and businesses cannot be overemphasised. But the negative aspects seem to be growing with mixed reactions after the death of Cynthia Osokogu who was killed by friends she met on social media.

Since the case of Cynthia went viral, ladies who were before now ashamed to share their experiences in the hands of bad guys have started talking.

Below is the near-death experience a young lady had with a man who was her BBM friend:

I am a girl who has fears, beliefs, reservations and just your regular typical Nigerian girl. This past few weeks has been one hell of a game for me. I have really been unsettled and I thought I share this story with you.

When Cynthia (the lady killed in the hotel room in Festac, Lagos) surfaced on the internet and various news media, I was scared and it brought back a whole lot of memories to me and also served as and eye opener. Many people castigated and criticised Cynthia (may her gentle soul rest in peace), but my point is, it could have been anybody, anybody at all.

We have met people through various social media. Some have ended up well, some have not but with painful memories. To cut the long story short, let me kindly share with you my encounter with social media especially the very popular Blackberry Messenger (BBM).

I am a graduate and currently serving in Kaduna. I could have runced it, but I needed somewhere to clear my head and forget about my ugly encounter. Here is my story.

I happened to have a married man as a contact on my BBM. He had been asking me out for over six months and I refused to date him. As time went on, he invited me clubbing with him when his wife was outside the country, and I went with him all night. We spent most of the night at Swe bar, Lagos.

I also met his clique of friends, married as well with their various mistresses. We had ‘mad’ fun. After all the clubbing and drinking, he lodged me in a hotel somewhere in Obalende. I felt sort of safe with him. We did not have sex, but he made sweet love to me and touched me in places I had never ever imagined.

He kissed me passionately but guess what? He did not have sex with me. We did all sorts but there was no penetration. So, to an extent, I trusted he was a good person to be around with. I did not know that it was all part of the plan.

He gave me N10,000 and put me in a cab to go home the next morning. We kept talking and chatting and sending naked pictures to each other and he told me naughty things of how he wanted to whisper things in my ear, I blushed. We didn’t see for two weeks and that was because his wife just came back from Turkey.

One faithful evening, he pinged me that he was organising a beach party/boat cruise and that he would love for me to be his date and that he wanted to open a BBM chat, as a medium for his friends and my friends to interact. I was excited about it, I just wanted to have fun. I was able to get five of my very hot friends.

The BBM group opened and we got chatting. I also realise that majority of them were married and working in reputable firms. It was fun and we didn’t mind if they were married, we just wanted to have fun, as well as some other girls apart from my friends in the group.

We chatted exclusively, sent pictures to the BBM group to introduce ourselves, and we had opened group conversations pending the beach party. And as excited as we were, we went shopping for nice sexy beach wears.

The D-day finally came, we all assembled at the Lagos Island Boat Club. I was wowed because it was a high class party. We were cruising in a boat loaded with goodies drinks and hot babes, and as well ‘MARRIED MEN’. I did not care, I just said in my mind that I would not roll with married men anymore after this, that for now, all I wanted to do was to catch some fun. After all, I wasn’t paying bills.

We got there, it was a private beach resort. Most of the beach facilities I got to see there were owned by multinational companies. We got out of the boat, and went to where we were partying. It was a duplex made with wood. It was a very nice setting.

I felt comfortable because it even had a fence around it separating it from other beach houses around. So, there was privacy and of course bouncers (heavy looking guys) guarding the place. I said to myself, this must be heaven, I must be dreaming.

Anyways, we felt free with each other because we had been chatting. It was 5:30pm and the party just started. We had drinks flowing from the private bar tender which happens to be owned by one of the men in the group. Reality struck when I realised that I was feeling dizzy and feeling really funny and light headed. Not only me, but other girls around me too noticed there was something strange about it.

I was also feeling HORNY as hell! I had been drugged. They monitored us and when they knew the drug had really gone deep into our system, they moved us up into the main beach house. I could still see faces, but was too weak and horny to react.

Mr B, the man who took me clubbing, carried me in his hands like a sacrifice and put me down on the floor just as other men also did with their girls. We were eight in numbers; 8 girls, 8 guys, and they all stripped us down and had sex with us.

I enjoyed it a bit because I was horny. It was a mixed feeling because I cried, I moaned, but I did not know how many times he came into me. He pounded me hard. I was dizzy, but he grabbed me with force. All I could notice was the wedding ring on his finger. I thought of how wicked and miserable some married can be. How inhuman and heartless they could be.

All of them took turns in switching partners and slept with all of us. I passed out. That was the last thing I could remember. I felt water poured on me. I noticed all the other girls around me too were half naked and some stark naked.

We spent the night at the beach, but the men were no where to be found. I looked round me and all I could see was packs of used condoms. I ran to pick my cloths and possibly raise an alarm. I got dressed, found my phone with an envelope. It contained N16,000 and a note asking us to take N2000 each for transport. Tears of anger and rage filled my eyes and the girls around me as well.

“We were drugged and used like tissue paper. I grabbed my phone and noticed a ping came in. I checked my phone and I noticed the BBM group had been deleted, and a message via BBM from MR B came in. He threatened me that if I say a word to anyone, I would regret it.

I told him he was a bastard, and he said try it. A picture came in, several pictures. In fact, they were pictures of us being naked on the floor. Pictures of the humiliating us but they blurred the faces of the men. In total, I got 20 pictures. I was not myself for a month.

I went back to school, I had no one to talk to. The rest of the semester was hell for me. My CGPA dropped drastically. It was the worst out of the worst result I ever had.

Till today, my friends and I have not discussed this with anyone, but all I could do when I heard of Cynthia’s story was to narrate my own ordeal anonymously and spread the news, the word, and pray they (ladies who do runs) see it and changed their ways.

I am now born again. I have given my life to Christ. I fear men so much that I cannot even move close to them. I still have nightmares, but with time, God will strengthen me and I will move on. My advice to single ladies out there is, do not be desperate for fun. Pray to God to open your eyes of understanding, and pray hard. He who kneels before God will stand before kings and queens.

To all married women, pray hard to God to intervene in your marriages and turn your husbands from bad habits and bad friends. As for me, I do not think I ever want to get married or date a man again. That chapter has been closed for good in my life.

Please, do not ignore my mail. Please post it. There are a lot of things we ladies need to learn. Please post it on your blog and save a soul. It could be your friend, sister, cousin, neighbour.

God bless you as you pass it on. To all readers, I do not care if you insult me or rain abuses at me. My job is to share this encounter with you and save you from any mishap. God bless you all. Amen.
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iTs iYaNyA aGaiN!!!

Iyanya is not wasting anytime in following up on the huge success of his previous hit ‘Kukere’, he is already out with the video of his banging hot single “Ur Waist.”

‘Ur Waist’ another splendid sound from the kukere crooner dwells on almost the same subject as Kukere, and as we have been rightly informed, it comes with a new dance step. The lovely crisp pictured video was directed by video the one and only music video shoot maestro Clarence Peters.
you can get to download and watch it on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94cFx9Y7LQU

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